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The History of Hotmail

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Hotmail webmail is a free email service, developed by two young men, Sabeer Bhatia and Jack Smith, launched on July 4 of 1996 (the Independence Day of the United States of America) as a symbol of freedom for the ISP (Internet Service Provider) mail. It was named Hotmail because it was a word that includes “mail” and “HTML”; that’s why, originally, it was referred as HoTMaiL, to emphasize the cap letters.

The History of Hotmail starts when Bhatia and Smith had the idea of creating an email that could be accessed from any computer, anywhere in the world; going through the firewalls that blocked the normal e-mail services. Their marketing strategy was spreading free email addresses and services, and attaching the simple phrase “Get your free, private e-mail @ http://www.hotmail.com” to every free message. By the year 1997, they were more than eight million subscribers. On December of 1997, the Microsoft company decides to buy Hotmail for $400 million.

old hotmail

But the history of Hotmail doesn’t end here. The following months, Hotmail was incorporated to several services of the Microsoft Network, such as the MSN messenger; they also incorporated the possibility of registering accounts in different languages. For the year of 1999, Hotmail was the world’s largest webmail service, with more than thirty million subscribers.

In 2004 experienced a renewal, Windows Live Hotmail. The concept was to make a much simpler, fast and secure interface. This lasted until the year of 2010, when Microsoft rebrand it as Outlook. This decision was taken after years of losing users to competing servers.

Nowadays, Hotmail remains as the biggest email brand in the world, with more than four hundred million users.


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